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Photographic work by Joel Caddy – Adelaide-based professional photographer – sports, photojournalism, family photos, roller derby, personal, travel

Heysen Trail Part V – Waitpinga to King’s Beach

The far southern coast of the Fleurieu Peninsula is just about the best place to escape the city without having to go far. 45minutes beyond Sellicks Hill lies some beautiful and varied coastline, fields, bush and scrubs.

This leg started at the Waitpinga campground and was fairly easy going. The Waitpinga cliffs are breathtaking – photos can’t do them justice. One day I’d love to hire a boat and eat dinner at the base of the cliffs.

After making it to King’s Beach Aki and I drove back to Waitpinga Beach, and we pretty much had the whole place to ourselves! We made curry on a gas stove and stargazed. Was amazing!

Photos were taken on a D700 with 28mm AI-s f2.8 or 100mm f2.8 macro lens.

Heysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to KingHeysen Trail Waitpinga to King

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Defeated – but I will return

In August I climbed Mt Fuji with Aki. Well, at least we attempted to.

We felt prepared; hiking shoes, rain jackets and thermal undies. We booked accommodation near the top so we could sleep and then rise early to see the goraikou (sunrise from Mt Fuji). As we ascended to the start of the walk by bus, the weather was foggy, but mild – it had been scorching hot and muggy in Japan for the previous couple of days.

We perused the shops at 5gome (the 5th station and start of the climb) and then headed off around midday with partial sun. Hikers coming from the opposite direction were of all ages; some super fit and others not so. But they all  looked like zombies and struggled to muster a smile as we passed. We laughed about how it couldn’t be that bad.

As we headed on to the main path the fog grew thicker until is was hard to see the hikers coming from the other way. Small amounts of rain dropped and we gradually added layers onto our shorts and t-shirts, until we were in weather proof trousers and raincoats, beanies and gloves. The camera also had to put into the bag as the rain increased.

As we ascended the wind picked up and the higher we climbed the colder it became. Despite the conditions we were overtaken by a few oldies and lots of children. We were faster than most though, and the worsening conditions made as push on. The wind started to come in sideways, from the front, from the back. What I thought was a waterproof jacket proved almost useless. The water soaked in, ran down my waterproof pants and into my non-waterproof shoes and socks. From my socks the water made its way up to my thermal undies and the process of becoming completely and utterly saturated was complete. Every station we reached we were told the same thing: “About another 2hours to 8gome” [where we were staying].

The “path” was an icy hell; jagged slippery red rocks with streams of water and no rails. The trail leads pretty much straight up Mt Fuji; unlike Australian hikes which generally circle up around mountains. From the ground Mt Fuji doesn’t look overly steep, but the higher you climb the steeper it gets.

When we thought we couldn’t push against the wind and rain and steep climbs any longer we were passed by a 14 year American girl in hot pants and a light raincoat. In any case it was a long way back down.

We reached our lodge at 8gome at about 5.30. We were above the snow line, and the accommodation was filled with soaking wet, some almost hypothermia-affected guests. Until 8 o’clock we huddled around a small oil heater trying to dry our clothes and shoes (at which time it was turned off!![we were told its rare for them to use the heater]) – talking with American marines and students, South African’s who had come from Dubai and one or two Japanese people. The food was disgustingly bad; but any sustenance was much appreciated.

The beds were small and uncomfortable but the covers and sleeping bags were warm. We arose at 4am, our clothes still wet. The sunrise was beautiful. It removed the cold and discomfort, made the climb worth every step and more. The wind was still quite harsh, and the temperatures low. Had our clothes been dry I have no doubt we could have pushed on to the summit.

The descent was easy and fast, with awesome weather and views. The path itself we could see this time. It reminded me of a scene from a war movie – large man-made structures hold up the best parts of the track, the stations look like bunkers on the side of the slope and the rocks look like the land has been attacked by mortars and bullets; plants and animals weren’t anywhere to be seen until much lower down the path. Being morning, the hikers coming the other way were all energetic and friendly; we exchanged cheerful ohayou gozaimasu‘s countless times. As we descended, occasionally we were passed from behind by men running down. Crazy.

I will return to reach the summit one day. This is unfinished business.

Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (1)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (2)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (3)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (4)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (5)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (6)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (7)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (8)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (9)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (10)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (11)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (12)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (13)Mt Fuji views hiking climb Japan photographer Joel C (14)

 

 

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Heysen Trail Part IV – Balquhidder West Campsite to Waitpinga Beach

My sister accompanied me. It was a different walk to the previous 3 Heysen trail legs. The landscape wasn’t as rigid and [probably because its winter] there were less animals and pretty much no flowers present. The trail passed through rolling hills and included Parsons Beach.

The leg took 2.5 hours, which is significantly shorter than previous legs. This was partly due to it being shorter, but mainly due to my sister setting a frenetic pace as she was afraid of arriving in Waitpinga after sunset and having to drive in the dark. She did stop briefly twice; once to swig her water, and once the save a suicidal inch ant from entering the surf on Waitpinga Beach.

For the photographers reading this, the wide angle shots were taken with a 28mm MF ai lens and the bird ones with macro 100mm. Wish I had a 600mm f/4 for the birds 😀

Balquhidder West - Heysen Trail

Balquhidder West Heysen Trail

Balquhidder West - Heysen Trail blog

Small creek Balquhidder West - Heysen Trail

Adelaide nature photography

Professioanl photography Heysen Trail landscape nature

Parsons Beach

Beach panorama - Parsons Beach South Australia

Adelaide Beach

Beach South Australia

Parsons Beach panorama landscape

Waitpinga view from clifftop

Beach abstract lighting

suicidal inch ant save by Eve

Waitpinga Beach surf

Seagull south australia

Waitpinga Beach landscape boardwalk

Clouds after sunset

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Des, Yen & Emma @ The Adelaide Botanic Gardens | Family Photography

I met Des & Yen at Lily and Aaron’s Beaumont House wedding. They left a lasting impression on me – genuine and down to earth. So when Yen called asking for a family photo session a couple of months later, I was all-too-happy to help make some photographs for them.

The adorable and slightly shy Emma was the star of the show; but apparently wont be in a few short months time – congratulations again, Des & Yen. They are also keen badminton players and administrators – keen to promote the game.

Adelaide boatnic gardens photo

Family portrait outside session adelaide

Family photography Adelaide

Adelaide botanic gardens professioanl photography family portrait

child photography family photography girl

Moreton bay fig tree Adelaide Botanic Gardens Family Photo

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MCRG 2012 Homicidolls [Team Portraits] – Roller Derby

For something different I went to a training session and took some portraits of the MCRG girls. Was great for a change – usually I’m scouting around looking for nice soft flattering light and trying to bring out the beauty and romance in my subjects. This shoot was a complete reversal – harsh and contrasty light used in portraits with attitude and personality.

I thought it’d be a lot cruisier than a wedding shoot. Alas, it was freakin’ hard work still! But very much rewarding as the girls were great to work with and I like final set of images. Thanks heaps MCRG for having me along.

Let’s hope they kick Tasmanian butt come March. Good luck, ladies!

MCRG Roller Derby Girls - Homicidolls (1)

MCRG Roller Derby Girls - Homicidolls (3)

Adelaide Roller Derby Portraits Photos Pics ADRD MCRG Gawler Roller Derby

MCRG Roller Derby Girls - Homicidolls (4)

MCRG Roller Derby Girls - Homicidolls (6)

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Heysen Trail Part III – Tappanappa Campsite to Balquhidder West Campsite

My wonderful wife Aki joined me for this leg of the Heysen Trail. Thank you Grandma and Wob for looking after the little ones.

We did this section in reverse – starting at Balquhidder and heading down the hill to Tunkalilla Beach for 4.5kms along the sand and then a 6km climb back up to Tappanappa. This leg wasn’t as hard as the previous, but doing it the “right” way would have been a nice reward for getting through Deep Creek. It took us about 4.5hrs.

For much of the way we were escorted by frolicking butterflies and the views were once again magnificent. Aki couldn’t stop proclaiming, “This is HEAVEN”. Although Aki was on the constant lookout for koalas (head pointed towards treetops) on this day we only came across kangaroos, crows, other birds including a kite, a small lizard and a handful of bluetongues.

For the photographer readers – I used a D700 with 100mm macro for most shots and a 18mm 2.8 prime for some shots down the beach.

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (1)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (2)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (3)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (4)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (5)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (6)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (7)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (8)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (9)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (10)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (11)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (12)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (13)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (14)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (15)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (16)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (17)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (18)

Tunkalilla Beach - Tappanappa Deep Creek to Balquhidder West Campsite - Bushwalking (19)

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